Define Custom RAML Properties Using Annotations

The fourth article in my RAML series on Baeldung.com focuses on the use of a feature called annotations that is new in RAML 1.0. In brief, annotations provide a means for extending the metadata of an API specification, allowing you to define custom properties that are not within scope of the official language spec. I hope you’ll enjoy Define Custom RAML Properties Using Annotations.

In case you missed any of the first three articles in the RAML series, I’ve included the links below. You can also find them in the REST category of the Baeldung.com site.

Other articles in the series:

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Modularization in RAML Using Includes, Libraries, Overlays and Extensions

The third article in my RAML series on Baeldung.com focuses on the modularization features of RAML. It contains a brief introduction to the use of includes (including typed fragments), libraries, overlays and extensions to make your API definitions more modular. I hope you’ll enjoy Modular RAML Using Includes, Libraries, Overlays and Extensions.

In case you missed the first two articles, I’ve included the links below. You can also find them in the REST category of the Baeldung.com site. The next article in the series will cover the use of annotations in RAML.

Other articles in the series:

Simplify RAML Using Resource Types and Traits

If you read my RAML Tutorial article, then you may have wondered whether the API definitions always have to be verbose, or if there are some shortcuts one can take in order to capture common patterns found in an API in order to simplify its definition.

If so, then you may enjoy Eliminate Redundancies in RAML Using Resource Types and Traits, the second article in the RAML series that I am currently writing for the Baeldung site.

The next article in the series will focus on modularization in RAML via the use of includes, libraries, overlays, and extensions.

Modeling RESTful Services with RAML

If you’ve done much development, design, or research in the area of web services in the past ten years, you have most likely encountered the term RESTful services or at least the REST acronym, unless you’ve been living under a rock. [And let’s face it, if you have been living under a rock — not that there’s anything wrong with that —  it’s doubtful that you have had much involvement with web services, so there you go.]

RAML stands for RESTful API Modeling Language and is built upon the YAML and JSON standards. If software engineering or design is your thing, and you are faced with designing and/or developing RESTful services, then I would encourage you to learn a little about RAML. A good starting point is Introduction to RAML – The RESTful API Modeling Language, an article that I wrote recently for Baeldung.